Duffy’s Recent Guest Reviews

We are proud to announce the results of the most recent HealthStream survey filled out by Duffy’s guests who completed their treatment.

HealthStream is a leading provider of learning and research solutions for the healthcare industry, transforming insight into action by surveying clients and delivering outcomes-based results for healthcare organizations.

Part of an Acadia-wide program, these surveys are handed to our guests during their last week in treatment. The sealed pre-addressed envelopes (to protect anonymity and increase participation) are collected and mailed directly to the HealthStream facility.

Duffy’s scored consistently 85% positive or higher in almost every category, surpassing Acadia’s sister facilities and the Recovery Division as a whole.

Duffy’s received 100% positive in the following categories:

  • Felt safe with providers – 100% Positive
  • Care responsive to needs – 100% Positive
  • Likelihood to recommend – 100% Positive
  • How often were you treated with courtesy and respect – 100% Positive
  • Understood purpose of taking medications after treatment – 100% Positive
  • Felt hopeful as a result of care – 100% Positive

The Duffy’s team is committed to striving for excellence!

Duffy’s Achieves 3-Year CARF Accreditation

As most of you know, Duffy’s Napa Valley has been in existence since 1967. Since then, Duffy’s has continually focused on advancing their quality of services to best meet the needs of their guests in pursuit of the best possible outcomes. In this effort, Duffy’s began working with the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF) in 2014 and achieved their first CARF Accreditation with close to 200 recommendations. We are extremely proud to announce that just last month, as a result of ongoing commitment to quality improvement and conformance with the CARF standards, Duffy’s achieved another 3-year Accreditation, this time with only 13 recommendations.

Founded in 1966, CARF International is an independent, nonprofit accreditor of health and human services. The CARF International group of companies currently accredits more than 50,000 programs and services at 25,000 locations. More than 10 million persons of all ages are served annually by 7,000 CARF-accredited service providers and Duffy’s is very proud to have their golden stamp of approval.”

Below is the actual CARF Survey Summary recognizing Duffy’s Napa Valley strengths (recent 3-year accreditation report):

• Duffy’s Napa Valley is located on 23 acres in a historic, unique, and beautiful setting. The grounds and facilities are well maintained, reflecting a clear priority for providing a serene and peaceful place for recovery.

• The leadership team is a strong group of highly trained and experienced professionals, who practice servant leadership as a philosophy, and it is evident in their day-to-day business practices. The leadership team is highly involved in the service delivery systems.

• The organization has experienced a change in ownership, and the transition was effectively implemented. The organization has welcomed the changes that come with new ownership, while still keeping the historical service philosophy that has driven the organization for nearly 50 years. The organization appears enhanced by the resources provided by new ownership.

• The organization is complimented for its long history of providing outstanding services. It has served over 37,000 guests while maintaining a strong commitment to its service philosophy and the recovery community.

• The staff promotes an environment of acceptance, support, and openness among the guests. There is a high level of engagement between the staff and guests.

• Guests feel well accommodated, and they report high levels of satisfaction with their meals and surroundings.

• The organization utilizes an extensive quality management system across all programs and services. The system allows for data collection that can be analyzed to promote overall performance improvement of its services and business practices to meet the needs of the guests.

• Guests feel very comfortable, and they report feeling a sense of being welcomed and accepted with no judgment.

Tempted by your Dog’s Prescription?

Veterinary Dangers with Prescription Drugs

When it comes to stealing prescription drugs in the workplace, most people immediately think of individuals who are employed at a pharmacy, hospital, or medical center partaking in this action. While illegally taking prescription drugs in these venues is an issue in itself, many individuals do not realize that their neighborhood veterinary office might also be experiencing the same problems.

Yes, it might sound strange to think that employees at a veterinary office would be rifling through prescription medications meant for animals such as cats and dogs; however, it is an occurrence that is happening within this profession.

There are a number of controlled substances that are used in people that are also used in treating animals, including Fentanyl, morphine, oxymorphone, hydromorphone, diazepam, and hydrocodone, to name a few. Some non-controlled substances that can also be found in a veterinarian’s medicine cabinet can include Propofol and trazodone. Additionally, ketamine, which is a medication used to begin the process of anesthesia for animals who are receiving surgery, is a commonly abused medication by individuals who are looking to obtain a sedative-like high. This medication, in particular, is popular in nightclubs nationwide.

So, it can be understood that those who struggle with substance use disorders and who have a pet who is prescribed one of these powerful medications might be tempted to abuse these substances instead of supplying them to their pet. Veterinarians are not responsible for caring for the pet’s owner, making them unable to determine if the owner is grappling with a substance use disorder. As a result, if the pet requires an opioid-based medication or a prescription pill to treat anxiety, he or she has no way of knowing if he or she is contributing to the owner’s addiction or drug abuse problem.

In the same breath, it isn’t just pet owners who are being tempted by their pets’ prescriptions. Many veterinarians and office staff who work within a vet’s office might be struggling with the compulsion to consume these prescription substances for recreational or self-medicating purposes. This can be a very precarious position to be in, as the temptation to take pills while having access to them at work can be so overpowering that the employee spirals out of control when it comes to abusing the medications meant for their pet population. Additionally, those who might not have developed a substance use disorder might start experimenting with these medications (especially if there is a culture of doing so within the workplace) and find him or herself trapped within an uncontrollable cycle of addiction.

According to a study led by a researcher from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), one in 10 veterinarians within America struggle with severe psychological upset. Also, more than one in six might have experienced suicidal ideation. These issues can be caused by external, non-work related factors; however, many in this field suffer these effects because of seeing their patients in pain and/or having to take actions such as putting a family pet down when his or her condition has left him or her incapacitated.

It is no secret that substance abuse is plaguing the United States at a rapid pace. However, a specific survey that was geared towards addiction in the veterinary world was conducted in 2015 and published in the Journal of American Veterinary Medical Association (JAVMA) reported that 72% of those who partook in the survey said they have worked within someone in a veterinary setting who they believed to have a substance abuse problem. Over 40% said they knew two or more people who struggled with this issue. A total of 68% said drug abuse was a major issue in this field of work, putting the spotlight on this profession, along with many others that are grappling with the fatal issue of substance abuse.

 

Kratom: The New Opioid?

According to the American Academy of Pain Medicine (AAPM), 1.5 billion people throughout the world struggle with a chronic pain condition. Within the United States alone, more prescriptions are written for painkillers such as Percocet, Vicodin, and OxyContin than in all other parts of the world combined. In 2011, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) declared prescription painkiller abuse an epidemic, as more and more individuals grappling with pain and/or addiction continued to abuse painkillers for a number of different purposes, ranging from managing pain caused by injury or illness to those looking to achieve the euphoric, detached effects that opioid-based medications such as these are known to produce.

Therefore, it should come as no surprise that, as the prescription painkiller epidemic continues to increase in America and other populations throughout the world, other means of killing pain will be sought out. One of the newest (and increasingly popular) medications individuals are turning to is Kratom, a substance that has roots in Southeast Asia. Kratom is a tree that is indigenous to this area and whose leaves are ground down into pill-form and/or powder form and then sold as a dietary supplement in head shops, as well as on the internet.

To obtain Kratom, all one has to do is purchase it at a head shop or order online. The draw to this medication is that, when consumed in small doses, it can produce stimulant effects. However, when abused in larger doses, its effects mimic traditional opioids, sedating the user and relieving his or her physical pain. This occurs because the active ingredient in Kratom, known as mitragynine, plugs the opioid receptors in the brain, easing pain. For some, this all-natural medication is massively attractive as it produces similar effects to an opioid without producing the risk of slowed breathing like traditional opioids do. In addition, Kratom has been known to treat withdrawal symptoms caused by other opioid abuse.

According to the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA), there is not a specific, valid medical need for this medication in the United States. Kratom is also currently banned in Wisconsin, Vermont, Tennessee, Indiana, Arkansas, and Alabama, despite some of the seemingly beneficial findings that this medication can produce.

As with any other mind-altering substance, the use and abuse of Kratom can be very dangerous. For example, some older reports found that Kratom can be linked to painful withdrawal symptoms when use has ended, including emotional disturbances, aggression, muscle aches and pains, uncontrollable muscle movements, and delusions/hallucinations. Additionally, the overall effects of this medication are not fully clear, making it very risky to abuse in the sense that the user and those around him or her are likely to be unaware of what might occur when consuming Kratom. As with many other medications of its kind, it is typically impossible to know exactly what substances are in Kratom, as it is a medication that can be exposed to synthetic chemicals and other naturally occurring substances that could produce one or more negative reactions. Also, since those who consume this medication are independently purchasing it, they are not receiving the actual medical attention they need for their conditions, whether it be a chronic pain issue or a substance abuse problem. Lastly, the risk of developing an addiction is always present when abusing a substance like Kratom.

Today, the DEA still states that Kratom is a “drug of concern.”

At Duffy’s Napa Valley Rehab, we are devoted to supplying high quality, comprehensive addiction treatment to individuals who have been battling substance abuse, including the abuse of opioids and other similar substances like Kratom. If you or someone you love is in need of help overcoming an addiction, please reach out to us right away. We can help.

Does medical marijuana lower prescription drug use?

Medical marijuana continues to be a hotly debated topic throughout the United States as more and more Americans are legally accessing the drug. As new states have legalized marijuana for medicinal purposes, some have criticized these decisions, implying that the legalization of cannabis for medical purposes is merely a “back door” method of legalizing the drug for recreational use.

However, research has shown that individuals are not just using the drug to get high, but are turning to marijuana to treat everything from chronic pain to sleep disorders. To that end, supporters of marijuana legalization tout the substance’s efficacy for medicinal purposes, but the apparent benefits do not end there. New information gathered from states who currently allow the legal use of marijuana is suggesting that legalization has resulted in large savings in these states’ Medicare prescription drug programs. It is believed that doctors in these states are prescribing medicinal marijuana for patients who suffer from some common conditions such as anxiety or glaucoma when prior to legalization, they would have only been able to recommend costly prescription drugs for men and women suffering from these diseases.

In a recent issue of Health Affairs, University of Georgia researchers published a study that found that in 2013, there were approximately $165.2 million in Medicare savings due to lower rates of prescription drug use. These significant savings occurred in a year when 17 states and the District of Columbia had allowed for the use of marijuana for medical purposes. Researchers are citing these findings as correlational, and posit that if all 50 states had also enacted similar legislation, overall savings to Medicare would have been around $468 million.

Healthcare is becoming more expensive with each passing year, and programs such as Medicare are designed to help some lower income individuals access the care they need. But as program budgets become increasingly strained, it may be prudent to consider the cost-saving effect of medical marijuana legislation. The millions of dollars in savings that could occur are undoubtedly needed to help keep programs like Medicare funded and functioning.

As we grapple with the hot-button topic of marijuana legalization, there are undoubtedly pros and cons to consider on both sides of the argument. As rates of prescription drug abuse are on the rise, policy makers and healthcare professionals are searching for ways to limit access and curb the abuse of these types of drugs. The opioid overdose epidemic is of particular concern, as these types of prescription drugs have been largely responsible for the recent spike in rates of overdose throughout the country.

Currently, according to the Controlled Substances Act, marijuana is a “Schedule 1” by the federal government under the Controlled Substances Act. A Schedule 1 classification denotes a highly restrictive categorization, and is to be reserved for drugs that the government considers to have high potential for abuse, significant safety concerns, and no medicinal value. Many who support the legalization of marijuana for medicinal purposes take issue with this classification, and as more data supports positive outcomes in the realms of both public health and economics, more states are removing restrictions on the substance.

In 1996, California became the first state to legalize marijuana for medicinal use, and since then several more states have adopted similar legislation. However, it will take some time to collect enough longitudinal data to gain a clearer picture on the effects of marijuana legalization for states with struggling Medicare budgets, and to understand more deeply the relationship between marijuana legislation and rates of prescription drug use.

The Connection Between Tobacco, Drugs & Marijuana

The drug landscape is changing in many ways today. Legislation is shifting around marijuana use, and awareness on the dangers of tobacco use has become an ingrained part of the cultural consciousness. Given these factors, new research has begun with the hopes of exploring the ways that combined drug use impacts one’s motivation to quit using tobacco or cannabis either jointly or independently, given the different ways that these substances impact the body and the mind.

Men and women who report marijuana use also typically report using tobacco with some frequency, so the relationship between these two drugs is certainly worth exploring. From an addictions perspective, marijuana is less habit-forming than tobacco, and its habit-forming properties are more in the realm of the behavioral as opposed to the physiological. Still, users who regularly combine both cannabis and tobacco together may find that quitting their use of either drug is more difficult than if they were using only one of these substances. This finding is but one data point that has been revealed from what is being touted as the largest online survey of current drug users to date.

Researchers from Frontiers in Psychiatry combed through the responses of over 30,000 drug users across the globe, and cite several trends that indicate that for users who regularly consume tobacco and marijuana together, quitting tobacco will be a much tougher endeavor. These findings raise several interesting questions about the nature of addiction, and the ways that drug combinations affect the brain. Further, this research may be useful in encouraging discussions on expanding legislation from a harm reduction perspective. Some suggest that efforts resources should be focused on encouraging methods of marijuana use that do not include the use of tobacco, and efforts could be helpful in limiting polysubstance abuse, and in turn, might make quitting one’s drug of choice a bit easier in the long run. For example, vaporizers have become popular in recent years, and offer less harmful means of inhaling than other routes that can increase damage to the respiratory system.

There are no simple routes to take when it comes to ending cycles of addictive behavior. But by gaining a deeper understanding of the ways various substances affect the body and the brain, addictions professionals will be better equipped to support the men and women who seek their support to end their chemical dependence. As countless individuals continue to grapple with issues of substance abuse, more research is certainly needed in the realm of the science of addiction, and in particular, the effects of multiple types of drug use on the brain.

For now, the recovery community must make an effort to create pathways to healing that reflect the unique challenges that someone experiencing the effects of polysubstance abuse is enduring. At Duffy’s Napa Valley Rehab, we know that addiction is a multifaceted issue, and our programming reflects the individual needs of the men and women who come to recover from chemical dependence and mental health concerns of all kinds.

Buprenorphine Prescriptions Tripled to Fight Opioid Epidemic

The abuse of opioids has become a prevalent problem throughout the United States. In fact, many consider this form of substance abuse to be an epidemic, as it has caused devastation in the lives of countless individuals, and yet appears to be continuously growing in prevalence.

It has been estimated that 80 people die from overdoses on opioid-based substances, which includes prescription painkillers and heroin, every day in the United States. This is the equivalent to just under 29,000 deaths related to opioid overdoses each year. Astoundingly, the number of deaths that result from drug overdoses are now even higher than those that result from automobile accidents.

The state of this epidemic has prompted the U.S. government to take action in an attempt to combat the destructive nature of this problem.

In early July 2016, the government expanded access to drugs that are used to treat opioid abuse and addiction. One such drug is buprenorphine, which is a mixed partial opioid agonist medication that is used to help treat opioid addiction by reducing or eliminating the withdrawal symptoms that would typically arise when a person attempts to stop using these types of substances.

Additionally, buprenorphine can decrease cravings, block the effects of other opioids, and ultimately help individuals achieve success in overcoming their addictions. Individuals who do not have access to medications like buprenorphine are much more likely to experience relapses should they attempt to discontinue their use.

Previously, doctors were limited in the amount of individuals for whom they could prescribe buprenorphine, maxing out at 100 people per physician. With this new initiative, however, those doctors will be able to obtain a waiver that allows them to prescribe the medication for as many as 275 people. In order to receive this waiver, prescribing physicians must obtain additional credentialing from a medical board or professional society, while also practicing in a qualified treatment setting.

By increasing the cap on the amount of people for whom doctors can prescribe buprenorphine, more individuals will have access to evidence-based opioid addiction treatment that can ultimately mean the difference between life and death.

At the present time, it is estimated that fewer than 32,000 physicians have authorization to prescribe buprenorphine, and only 6,000 of them are actively writing these prescriptions. By increasing the ability that doctors have to prescribing this medication, which is also sold under the brand name Suboxone, the hope is that more physicians will actively expand their practices in order to be able to offer this important treatment intervention.

In addition to the increase in allowances for access to buprenorphine, President Barrack Obama has called for increased funding in the amount of $1.1 billion in order to provide individuals with the ability to receive treatment wherever they reside, further enhancing the likelihood that people will take advantage of the treatment available to them.

By taking these steps, the government is not only raising awareness of the opioid epidemic, but is also providing individuals who are trapped in the insidious pattern of abusing opioids with tangible means of overcoming their addictions.

The Pros and Cons of Medical Marijuana

Medical marijuana continues to be a hotly debated topic throughout the United States as more and more Americans are legally accessing the drug. As new states have legalized marijuana for medicinal purposes, some have criticized these decisions, implying that the legalization of cannabis for medical purposes is merely a “back door” method of legalizing the drug for recreational use.

However, research has shown that individuals are not just using the drug to get high, but are turning to marijuana to treat everything from chronic pain to sleep disorders. To that end, supporters of marijuana legalization tout the substance’s efficacy for medicinal purposes, but the apparent benefits do not end there. New information gathered from states who currently allow the legal use of marijuana is suggesting that legalization has resulted in large savings in these states’ Medicare prescription drug programs. It is believed that doctors in these states are prescribing medicinal marijuana for patients who suffer from some common conditions such as anxiety or glaucoma when prior to legalization, they would have only been able to recommend costly prescription drugs for men and women suffering from these diseases.

In a recent issue of Health Affairs, University of Georgia researchers published a study that found that in 2013, there were approximately $165.2 million in Medicare savings due to lower rates of prescription drug use. These significant savings occurred in a year when 17 states and the District of Columbia had allowed for the use of marijuana for medical purposes. Researchers are citing these findings as correlational, and posit that if all 50 states had also enacted similar legislation, overall savings to Medicare would have been around $468 million.

Healthcare is becoming more expensive with each passing year, and programs such as Medicare are designed to help some lower income individuals access the care they need. But as program budgets become increasingly strained, it may be prudent to consider the cost-saving effect of medical marijuana legislation. The millions of dollars in savings that could occur are undoubtedly needed to help keep programs like Medicare funded and functioning.

As we grapple with the hot-button topic of marijuana legalization, there are undoubtedly pros and cons to consider on both sides of the argument. As rates of prescription drug abuse are on the rise, policy makers and healthcare professionals are searching for ways to limit access and curb the abuse of these types of drugs. The opioid overdose epidemic is of particular concern, as these types of prescription drugs have been largely responsible for the recent spike in rates of overdose throughout the country.

Currently, according to the Controlled Substances Act, marijuana is a “Schedule 1” by the federal government under the Controlled Substances Act. A Schedule 1 classification denotes a highly restrictive categorization, and is to be reserved for drugs that the government considers to have high potential for abuse, significant safety concerns, and no medicinal value. Many who support the legalization of marijuana for medicinal purposes take issue with this classification, and as more data supports positive outcomes in the realms of both public health and economics, more states are removing restrictions on the substance.

In 1996, California became the first state to legalize marijuana for medicinal use, and since then several more states have adopted similar legislation. However, it will take some time to collect enough longitudinal data to gain a clearer picture on the effects of marijuana legalization for states with struggling Medicare budgets, and to understand more deeply the relationship between marijuana legislation and rates of prescription drug use.

California Voters to Consider Marijuana Legalization

When Californians head to the polls on Nov. 8, they won’t only be helping to determine who the next president of the United States will be. They will also be deciding if California will become the fifth U.S. state to legalize the sale, possession, and use of marijuana by adults.

The combination of California’s size, financial strength, and cultural clout suggests that the vote to legalize marijuana could be a watershed moment in the ongoing national debate over how to control what has for decades been one of the most commonly abused recreational substances.

Proposition 64, which is referred to as the Adult Use of Marijuana Act (AUMA), will appear on ballots under the headline “Marijuana Legislation Initiative Statute.” According to California’s Official Voter Information Guide, passage of the proposition would lead to the following outcomes:

  • Legalization of marijuana under state law, for use by adults 21 or older.
  • Designation of state agencies to license and regulate the marijuana industry.
  • Imposition of state excise tax of 15% on retail sales of marijuana, and state cultivation taxes on marijuana of $9.25 per ounce of flowers and $2.75 per ounce of leaves.
  • Exemption of medical marijuana from some taxation.
  • Establishment of packaging, labeling, advertising, and marketing standards and restrictions for marijuana products.
  • Prohibition on marketing and advertising of marijuana directly to minors.
  • Permission for local regulation and taxation of marijuana.
  • Authorization of resentencing and destruction of records for prior marijuana convictions

Though the legal changes included in Prop 64 will only impact the state of California, experts are confident that the impact of this proposition’s passage would be felt throughout the nation.

For example, in a July 5 article on the Rolling Stone website, Allen St. Pierre, executive director of the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML), said that a decision by Californians to legalize marijuana would be a “total dynamic change” that would energize efforts to achieve nationwide legality for the controversial substance.

An Aug. 19 Los Angeles Times article noted that the size of the California economy would enable the state to collect a windfall of tax money from a newly legal marijuana industry. According to that article, it is estimated that legal marijuana would contribute up to $1 billion in annual taxation within a few years. For purposes of comparison, Colorado’s legal marijuana industry accounted for about $135 million in tax revenue in 2015.

On Aug. 24, a report issued by market research firms The Arcview Group and New Frontier estimated that, if Prop 64 passes in November, a legal marijuana industry in California could expect to reach $6.5 billion in annual revenue by the year 2020.

While most experts appear to agree that the measure is likely to pass, the opinion on the effect of this legislative change is far from universal.

In an Aug. 24 Mercury News article, John Kaiga of New Frontier predicted that the passage of Prop 64 will lead to California becoming “the new epicenter of cannabis,” which will in turn prompt “professionalism of the industry [and] an emphasis on innovation.”

This positive view is countered by, among others, several prominent individuals within the California law enforcement community. Orange County Sheriff Sandra Hutchens told the Orange County Register that legalization of marijuana “would be a terrible move for California to make,” while San Bernardino County District Attorney Mike Ramos said that passing Prop 64 “will do nothing to curb black-market activity in California.”

On Aug. 20, about 12 weeks before Election Day, polls showed that Proposition 64 was favored by 55 percent of Californians. When the polling was restricted to likely voters, support rose to 60 percent.

Drug Use on the Job

Here in the Golden State, our communities bustle with a wealth of opportunity. There are countless ways to advance professionally, working alongside leaders in a variety of industries. Here in California, we’re proud of our workforce and all they’ve accomplished, but beneath the surface of career success and economic viability lies an unfortunate truth. Californians from all walks of life suffer from the negative impact of addiction, and countless individuals are fighting the battle of substance abuse on a daily basis.

Aside from the damaging physical consequences of abusing drugs or alcohol, addiction can negatively impact one’s ability to maintain healthy relationships with friends and family, and perform to the best of one’s ability at work. As the addiction progresses, the affected person’s ability to function becomes more and more compromised. It may be harder to keep track of schedules, multitask, and maintain emotional regulation within the work environment, and co-occurring disorders such as depression and anxiety will only exacerbate the problem.

If you haven’t had personal experience with addiction, you may wonder about these faceless individuals who are struggling with substance abuse each day. The truth is, they are your friends and neighbors, your boss or coworker, or someone you might pass on your commute each day. Addiction doesn’t discriminate by race or class, and affects every segment of the population. Consider the following professions, and how substance abuse might affect individuals who hold these occupations. An addiction can certainly impact one’s livelihood, but the consequences also extend to our communities and beyond.

  • On a daily basis, lawyers manage complicated judicial matters and legal briefings that would make many heads spin. An addiction may compromise their ability to juggle all the tasks at hand, and could potentially result in them being disbarred if their ability to execute sound, ethical judgement becomes compromised.
  • Artists have, at times, been known to misuse substances as part of the creative process. But a clouded mind and erratic behavior creates distraction and does not allow for an artist to do his or her best work.
  • Chefs and restaurant workers make the meals we share with friends, families, and colleagues. Restaurants are important gathering spaces in our communities, but if a chef’s clarity is compromised by drugs or alcohol, our safety could be at risk.
  • Nurses bandage our wounds and offer lifesaving care. Their high-stress jobs and access to prescription drugs puts them at a heightened risk for substance abuse. Doctors and nurses struggling with addiction aren’t only a danger to themselves. Rather, they could be putting the public’s health at risk if their ability to reason and perform in emergency situations is hindered.
  • Accountants are responsible for crunching the numbers that keep our businesses afloat. If an accountant is abusing drugs or alcohol, the mistakes they make could be costly and cause their clients to be faced with legal vulnerability.
  • Software developers are individuals who are tasked with both creative and technical execution in their work. When their functioning is compromised by drugs or alcohol, their ability to innovate will be limited.
  • School teachers are tasked with caring for one of our community’s most precious assets, our children. For some students, their teacher is the most consistent adult figure in their lives. These children look to their classroom teacher to make them feel safe at school with a predictable, caring presence. Drug or alcohol abuse can make one’s personality increasingly erratic, and can have a damaging impact on the student/teacher relationship.

At Duffy’s, we’ve treated over 36,000 guests and we’re proud of our legacy of providing quality treatment services to guests from all walks of life. Our 95% completion rate sets us apart from other recovery centers, and demonstrates the high level of care we provide. No matter your background, we invite you to explore opportunities for healing at Duffy’s.