Increased Precautions We're Taking in Response to the Coronavirus
As updates on the impact of the coronavirus continue to be released, we want to take a moment to inform you of the heightened preventative measures we have put in place at Duffy's Napa Valley Rehab to keep our patients, their families, and our employees safe. All efforts are guided by and in adherence to the recommendations distributed by the CDC.

Please note that for the safety of our patients, their families, and our staff, on-site visitation is no longer allowed at Duffy's Napa Valley Rehab.

  • This restriction has been implemented in compliance with updated corporate and state regulations to further reduce the risks associated with COVID-19.
  • We are offering visitation through telehealth services so that our patients can remain connected to their loved ones.
  • Alternate methods of communication for other services are being vetted and may be offered when deemed clinically appropriate.

For specific information regarding these changes and limitations, please contact us directly.

CDC updates are consistently monitored to ensure that all guidance followed is based on the latest information released.

  • All staff has received infection prevention and control training.
  • Thorough disinfection and hygiene guidance has been provided.
  • Patient care supplies such as masks and hand sanitizer are being monitored and utilized.
  • Temperature and symptom screening protocols are in place for all patients and staff.
  • Social distancing strategies have been implemented to ensure that patients and staff maintain proper distance from one another at all times.
  • Cleaning service contracts have been reviewed for additional support.
  • Personal protective equipment items are routinely checked to ensure proper and secure storage.
  • CDC informational posters are on display to provide important reminders on proper infection prevention procedures.
  • We are in communication with our local health department to receive important community-specific updates.

The safety of our patients, their families, and our employees is our top priority, and we will remain steadfast in our efforts to reduce any risk associated with COVID-19.

The CDC has provided a list of easy tips that can help prevent the spread of the coronavirus.

  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue and then immediately dispose of the tissue.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth.
  • Clean and disinfect objects and surfaces that are frequently touched.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.
  • Stay home when you are sick, except to get medical care.

For detailed information on COVID-19, please visit https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html

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How long does it take to break the habit of an addiction?

While addiction in itself is not a habit, there is a strong correlation between the cycle of addiction and the subconscious pattern of a habit. After all, addiction is kind of like a habit on steroids—a regular practice or manner of behavior that is really, really hard to give up.

How long does it take to break the habit of addiction?

 

It takes 21 days to break an addiction

The old belief that it took 21 days to change a habit has now been labeled a myth. According to psychologists, while it may take approximately 21 days of conscious and consistent effort to create a new habit, it takes far longer to break an existing habit.

It can take up to 90 days to break an addiction

TIME article gives scientific evidence that it takes approximately 90 days for “the brain to reset itself and shake off the immediate influence of a drug.” Researchers from Yale University found a gradual re-engaging of proper decision making and analytical functions in the brain’s prefrontal cortex after an addict has abstained for at least 90 days.

This may help explain why 90 day rehab has a higher success rate than short term treatment. As the current gold standard of treatment, 90 day rehab gives your brain time to reset itself, allows you to then master the skills of recovery, and allows time for those new patterns to become habits.

It requires time to achieve any goal, and recovery from addiction is no different. As the old saying goes, “The best friend a patient has in treatment is time.”

The reality: addiction lasts the rest of your life

Although 90 days is considered the gold standard of treatment, you can’t put a timeline on beating an addiction. Addiction is a life-long enemy, and recovery is a daily battle–even after years of sobriety.

Duffy’s Napa Valley Rehab can help you break from addiction by teaching you how to do the daily work to achieve recovery.